RMIT featured blogger, CSIT’s Isaac Balbin, on RMIT’s rich multiculturalism

RMIT proves that multiculturalism is not just a worthy aim, but that it enriches the university experience for all

RMIT proves that multiculturalism is not just a worthy aim, but that it enriches the university experience for all

Academics are caught up in their world of teaching and research. After all, the science of discovery and the transmission of ideas constitutes the DNA of an academic, and is the source of the primary motive behind an earlier decision not to join the “regular” work-force. It has been argued that many academics display mild aspergian traits. Does this imply that academics meander through academic life somehow shielded or oblivious to the sublime amalgamation of students comprising the educational throng? Assuredly, this has never been the case with me; I have been touched.

RMIT has a long and glorious reputation for quality, work-ready, education. I’m of the view, however, that a corner-stone of RMIT’s success as a beacon attracting a veritable cornucopia of international students even against a prevalent tide, is its welcoming, caring and personable nature. The spirit of RMIT envelopes a style of tolerance that not only assuages concerns of racism, it nurtures a palpable, positive and pervasive neomulti-cultural identity.

I’ve been at RMIT for many years. Before you interpret read this as a hoary sentimental address signalling my impending retirement, let me assure you that I intend to be part of this place for many more years to come. Having spent a majority of my RMIT time travelling the world interviewing prospective students, I developed a healthy respect for cultural diversity, together with sensitivity and love for those things that make people different.

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I’ve been at RMIT for many years. Before you interpret read this as a hoary sentimental address signalling my impending retirement, let me assure you that I intend to be part of this place for many more years to come. Having spent a majority of my RMIT time travelling the world interviewing prospective students, I developed a healthy respect for cultural diversity, together with sensitivity and love for those things that make people different.multi-cultural tapestry that is RMIT
By Isaac Balbin | Published: 31/10/2012
Academics are caught up in their world of teaching and research. After all, the science of discovery and the transmission of ideas constitutes the DNA of an academic, and is the source of the primary motive behind an earlier decision not to join the “regular” work-force. It has been argued that many academics display mild aspergian traits. Does this imply that academics meander through academic life somehow shielded or oblivious to the sublime amalgamation of students comprising the educational throng? Assuredly, this has never been the case with me; I have been touched.
RMIT has a long and glorious reputation for quality, work-ready, education. I’m of the view, however, that a corner-stone of RMIT’s success as a beacon attracting a veritable cornucopia of international students even against a prevalent tide, is its welcoming, caring and personable nature. The spirit of RMIT envelopes a style of tolerance that not only assuages concerns of racism, it nurtures a palpable, positive and pervasive neomulti-cultural identity.
Academics are caught up in their world of teaching and research. After all, the science of discovery and the transmission of ideas constitutes the DNA of an academic, and is the source of the primary motive behind an earlier decision not to join the “regular” work-force. It has been argued that many academics display mild aspergian traits. Does this imply that academics meander through academic life somehow shielded or oblivious to the sublime amalgamation of students comprising the educational throng? Assuredly, this has never been the case with me; I have been touch

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